FAQs

Am I eligible to apply to the Don Lavoie Fellowship program?

Advanced undergraduate students, students who have graduated and are considering graduate school, and early-stage graduate students interested in the Mercatus approach to political economy and policy analysis are encouraged to apply.

I am not an economics major. Am I still eligible?

Yes, the Don Lavoie Fellowship is open to students from any discipline or program.

I am not based in the United States. Am I eligible for the fellowship?

Any student of any nationality at any university, in the US or abroad, is eligible to apply for the Don Lavoie Fellowship. The program will be conducted entirely online.

What does an entirely online fellowship look like?

The fellowship will focus on two major activities:

Online reading group sessions: Fellows will meet virtually four times throughout the semester in organized reading groups to discuss books written by Hayek Program scholars.

Online discussion portal: The main discussion forum will include videos, podcast episodes, and readings on the key ideas of the Austrian, Virginia and Bloomington schools of political economy and prompts for written discussion.

Don Lavoie Fellows are required to have internet access to participate in this program.

What is the schedule of events?

Specific dates are subject to some variability and are communicated to successful applicants.

How will the readings and other materials associated with my involvement in the Lavoie Fellowship Program be provided?

Fellows are responsible for making sure the program has up to date contact information, including email and valid postal address. Readings will be distributed electronically (if applicable) and by post in advance of each online reading group discussion. Supplemental materials including podcasts, videos, and journal articles, will be posted in the online discussion portal for fellows to access anytime.

May I have a job or other fellowship/assistantship and still participate in the Lavoie Fellowship program?

Yes, the Don Lavoie Fellowship is a supplemental program and fellows may hold jobs and other fellowships/assistantships during their time in the program.

Am I eligible to receive the funding provided by the Don Lavoie Fellowship Program?

Each fellow is responsible for making the appropriate verifications of their eligibility to receive funding from the Mercatus Center. Fellows should check with their home departments, international student offices, or private foundations (as appropriate) to verify their eligibility. Fellows are responsible for any taxes on the honoraria provided for participation in the Don Lavoie Fellowship.

Are there additional opportunities for support for participants in the Don Lavoie Fellowship Program?

Yes. Don Lavoie Fellows are eligible to apply for conference travel and research support. Don Lavoie Fellows who continue their studies in graduate school are also encouraged to apply to the Mercatus Center’s graduate student fellowship programs.

Mercatus was unable to accept me for the Don Lavoie Fellowship this year. Can I apply again?

Yes.

Who was Don Lavoie?

Don Lavoie was the David H. and Charles G. Koch Chair of Economics at the School of Public Policy, George Mason University. He received a BS in Computer Science from Worcester Polytechnic Institute in 1973 and a Ph.D. in Economics in 1981 from New York University. His research focused on the use of knowledge in economic and organizational contexts. He is best known as the author of two books published in 1985, Rivalry and Central Planning and National Economic Planning: What is Left?, which elaborate on the “Austrian” school’s critique of centralized economic planning.

Don Lavoie was the embodiment of an academic entrepreneur, having been an active faculty member of the economics, public policy, and cultural studies PhD programs at George Mason University as well as innovator in teaching methods, interdisciplinary collaboration, and the pursuit of understanding in social science. He also advanced a teaching philosophy founded on a deep engagement with texts and discussions where students and teachers from multiple disciplines learn from, respect, and collaborate with one another. He was fascinated by and experimented with new technologies, including hypertext and online class discussions, where students could engage with texts in new ways, communicate with one another, and determine much of their own path of study. Lavoie’s intellectual curiosity and integrity has been an inspiration and guiding force for his students and their students, and his pedagogical philosophy has influenced much of the curriculum and activities critical to Mercatus fellowship programs. With this fellowship, we aim to continue his legacy by utilizing online discussion platforms to expose more students to the Mercatus approach to political economy and policy analysis.

For more information see: https://donlavoie.org/

I still have questions about the Don Lavoie Fellowship Program.

Email LavoieFellowship@mercatus.gmu.edu regarding general questions about the Don Lavoie Fellowship or questions about your application materials or application status.